Tricks used in scams

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Scammers use clever tricks to reel you in and get you to reply to their email or not hang up the phone. Most scams seem like genuine offers but they are carefully designed to trick you into giving away your money or your personal details. Here we break down some of the scamming tricks used so you are aware of them and can be on guard.

Scammers use persuasive psychological binary secret is the same old scam wrapped in a different packaging to make you part with your money. Some may offer a free gift or assistance to make you feel obliged to return the favour. Remember, you do not owe the scammer anything so don't be pressured into giving them something in return.

The terms 'last chance' or 'limited offer' are often used by scammers to make you act fast. They don't want to give you any time to check if their offer is real before you commit to it.

If you're being pressured to act fast, don't. Scammers know that if they develop a friendly relationship with you, you are more likely to listen to them and go along with whatever they are suggesting.

Some scammers access groups of people in churches or community groups and gain their trust. While the investment or offer appears to be going well, they can recruit new victims on the testimony of other people already in the scheme.

Scammers will say they are approved or associated with another reputable organisation or government agency to convince you of their legitimacy. They hope that you have heard of these organisations so you will trust them.

They might also say they are a professional brokerportfolio manager or investment dealer. Even if they sound professional and have slick brochures and documents to send you, binary secret is the same old scam wrapped in a different packaging are working to a carefully crafted script. See our fake regulators and exchanges webpage for more information. They do this to make you feel uneasy and to defend your original actions.

You need to tell them that just because you agreed to something earlier doesn't mean you can't change your binary secret is the same old scam wrapped in a different packaging about it later. Scammers can call you endlessly or try to keep you on the phone for a long time.

They present you with promises of wealth or opportunities lost if you do not take up the offer. Scammers will not take no for an answer and might ask you about your worries to reassure you.

As long as they can keep you talking you have not really said binary secret is the same old scam wrapped in a different packaging. Scammers can also send you text messages and emails that look like they're from your bank. Don't respond to texts asking you to follow a link and provide personal information like account numbers or personal details. Scammers are clever at offering you incredible deals that promise great returns with very little or no risk.

But if it seems too good to be true, it often is. See investment warnings for details on schemes that may not be very good value for money. Many scammers create professional-looking websites to prove to you that their product is real and worth the money they want you to pay. They can also send links to these websites in fraudulent emails which look like they're from your bank or another business you may deal with asking you to give up personal information. Find out more about how fake websites work in investment scams.

Scammers will create fake profiles using information they have stolen or made up. The person may be someone you know and they will send you a friend request or message, then ask for money to help them with trouble they are having. They may know personal details of your friends if they have hacked their accounts, and by accepting their friend request they could gain access to your personal information and steal your identity.

See identity fraud for more information on how to protect yourself. Kate gets scammed video. Kate learns that not all sites can be trusted. Watch this video to see how Kate learns to recognise friendly websites. Make you feel obligated Get in before the offer ends Become your friend Claim to be professionals Get you to agree Persistent phone calls Incredible offers of easy money Fake websites Fake social media profiles Make you feel obligated Scammers use persuasive psychological tactics to make you part with your money.

Get in before the offer ends The terms 'last chance' or 'limited offer' are often used by scammers to make you act fast. Become your friend Scammers know that if they develop a friendly relationship with you, you are more likely to listen to them and go along with whatever they are suggesting. Claim to be professionals Scammers will say they are approved or associated with another reputable organisation or government agency to convince you of their legitimacy.

Persistent phone calls, text messages and emails Scammers can call you endlessly or try to keep you on the phone for a long time. Incredible offers of easy money Scammers are clever at offering you incredible deals that promise great returns with very little or no risk. Fake websites Many scammers create professional-looking websites to prove to you that their product is real and worth the money they want you to pay.

Fake social media profiles Scammers will create fake profiles using information they have stolen or made up. Kate gets scammed Kate gets scammed video Kate learns that not all sites can be trusted.

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Unfortunately, it has become very easy for someone to steal your personal details and carry out illegal activities in your name. However, you can take steps to protect yourself from identity fraud by following the tips below.

Identity fraud is a type of fraud that involves the theft of your personal information, including your name, date of birth, address and other details. Fraudsters then use this information, for example, to open bank accounts, obtain credit cards, start an illegal business or apply for a passport. Your details may also be used to commit serious crimes, such as money laundering and even terrorist acts. Identity thieves are after everything that contains your personal information: There are many ways in which people can steal your identity.

Your personal information is everywhere: If you suddenly start receiving less mail, be cautious. This could mean that scammers are stealing or redirecting your mail. This makes it easy for someone to get your personal details. For example, they can look through your garbage bins for bills and bank statements, steal your wallet or bag, break into your letter box or home, or hack into your computer.

Identity thieves are also becoming more sophisticated. They may send you a letter, email, SMS or message through social media to 'phish' for information or pretend to be calling on behalf of your bank or a government department, and trick you into giving them information. They may install a program on your computer that allows them to 'spy' on you and track your keystrokes every time you use your desktop computer or laptop. See requests for your account information for more details on phishing.

So how can you tell if someone is pretending to be you? Some telltale signs are if you start receiving bills, credit cards, loan statements or calls from creditors that you know nothing about or if you have difficulty obtaining a credit card or a loan because of an inexplicably bad credit rating. You might also notice that the amount of mail you receive is decreasing - which may indicate that items are being stolen or that mail is being redirected somewhere else. If your social media account has been hacked, you may notice posts appearing that you did not write, someone has logged into your account from an unusual location, your wall is flooded with spammy posts, and you are suddenly following a lot of new, unknown people.

For more information on online scam protection, see the Australian Goverment website Stay Smart Online. Find out how to report a scam and where to find support after being scammed. Identity theft can be devastating, both financially and emotionally. Follow the above guidelines to protect yourself and always alert the authorities if you suspect your details have been stolen or are being misused. If you think your personal information has been stolen, contact the police immediately. How identity theft happens There are many ways in which people can steal your identity.

Smart tip If you suddenly start receiving less mail, be cautious. Quick links Unclaimed money Publications Financial advisers register Financial counselling Payday loans Unlicensed companies list Report a scam How to complain Other languages eNewsletter. Having a baby Buying a mobile Losing your job more life events